A Chat with Allan Woodrow-Author of The CURSE of The WEREPENGUIN

Today, I’m super excited to welcome Allan Woodrow to the blog! Allan is the author of the new MG novel, The Curse of The Werepenguin, with Viking Books for Young Readers. I loved every minute of this hilarious story. I think you will too.

For now, take a moment to get to know more about the author. 

Here we go . . . .

Lisa: Tell us about The Curse of The Werepenguin.

Allan: Bolt Wattle is twelve years old and an orphan. He thinks he’ll never have a family. But then he is sent to live with a mysterious Baron in the far-away country of Brugaria. Oddly, the Baron appears to be a 12-year old boy. Even more oddly, and much more terribly, the Baron turns into an evil penguin at midnight. As far as families go, it’s pretty much rock bottom. Bolt is bitten by the Baron and has just three days to figure out a way to break the curse and defeat the Baron, or he’ll become an evil penguin creature forever and join the Baron’s horrible penguin army. Along the way he’s helped by a bandit girl, chased by members of a crazy whale cult, and has to enlist the help of a depressed housekeeper and a cackling fortune teller. As you probably guessed, it’s based on a true story.

Lisa: How did you come up with the idea?

Allan: I’ve always enjoyed old monster movies like Dracula and The Wolfman, and thought it would be fun to twist those in a more comical way. Sure, a half-wolf creature is horrible, but who decided that wolves were the only were-creatures around? What about were-fleas and were-aardvarks? Penguins tend to raise their young and are (mostly) monogamous. Also, they’re funny. They were a great animal to weave into a were-creature horror story with a heartfelt message about the importance of family, in whatever shape and form that family comes in.

Lisa: Do you base your characters on people you know? If yes, spill the beans!

Allan: No, I don’t base my characters on real people. I may borrow someone’s name, but that’s about it. My characters all have a small sliver of me in them though–I tap into my own emotions and experiences as a starting point and go from there.

Lisa: How much of your real-life experiences play a role in the stories you tell?

Allan: When I was a kid my teachers told me to “write about what you know” and I always thought that meant I couldn’t write about astronauts unless I was an astronaut, or did a lot of research about astronauts. And while that’s true, I think that also refers to emotions. You can’t write about love unless you know how to love. When you write about anger, you tap into those times you were angry. So my real-life experiences come into play because of the emotions I felt at those times. Hopefully, I can take those emotions, put them into the heart of a character, and make the scene feel like it could really have happened. I’ve never been a were-penguin, but everyone has felt lonely at one time, or felt like they didn’t belong, or yearned for…something. How can I bottle those feelings and drip them into a character’s head so the audience can understand the confusion, pain, and feelings of an unwanted penguin monster?

Lisa: What books did you like to read when you were a kid? Do those books influence your writing?

Allan: I always tell kids to read what they love to read, whether that’s comic books or graphic novels or penguin horror stories (preferably, penguin horror stories). When I was in elementary school, I was encouraged to read books that were parent-or-teacher approved. I didn’t like a lot of those, and it turned me off reading for many years. I can’t say any book I read as a kid influenced me, other than I don’t want to write books that I wouldn’t have read when I was nine-years old. Sometimes kids tell me that they didn’t like to read until they read one of my books…that’s the most rewarding part of writing children books.

Lisa: What are you working on now?

Allan: The Curse of the Werepenguin will be followed by Revenge of the Werepenguin and Battle of the Werepenguins (the title of that last one might change). Revenge is done, but I’m still working on Battle.

Lisa: What is your writing process? Are you a plotter or a pantser?

Allan: I love this question, because I ask it all the time and some writers blink and aren’t familiar with the expression. I am 100% a plotter. I write 20-40 page outlines of my books before I sit down. I still sometimes change things, but then I go back to the outline and change that and see what other things need to shift. Only then do I make the change in the manuscript.

Lisa: What advice do you have for aspiring authors?

Allan: Nothing writes itself, and the only way to get better as a writer, is to write. If you really want to be an author, find time to write, every day if you can. It’s easy to make excuses not to write. But serious writers ignore those excuses, even when they really, really want to be doing something else, such as answering blogger questions…Which means, I need to get back to work!

Thanks so much for visiting the Spooky MG, Allan. I hope this wasn’t too scary!

To learn more about Allan Woodrow and his books visit Allan Woodrow.

Allan’s Books Include: 
The Curse of the Werepenguin
The Liberty Falls Elementary Series
  Field Tripped 
  Unschooled 
  Class Dismissed
The Pet War
The Rotten Adventures of Zachary Ruthless

And many other books, some written under secret names
 
Coming Summer, 2020: The Revenge of the Werepenguin

 

A Chat with Heather Kassner, Author of The Bone Garden

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The Bone Garden by Heather Kassner

Release date: August 6, 2019

A spooky and adventurous debut illustrated fantasy novel about a girl made of dust and bone and imagination who seeks the truth about the magic that brought her to life.

“Remember, my dear, you do not really and truly exist.”

Irréelle fears she’s not quite real. Only the finest magical thread tethers her to life―and to Miss Vesper. But for all her efforts to please her cruel creator, the thread is unraveling. Irréelle is forgetful as she gathers bone dust. She is slow returning from the dark passages beneath the cemetery. Worst of all, she is unmindful of her crooked bones.

When Irréelle makes one final, unforgivable mistake by destroying a frightful creature just brought to life, Miss Vesper threatens to imagine her away once and for all. Defying her creator for the very first time, Irréelle flees to the underside of the graveyard and embarks on an adventure to unearth the mysterious magic that breathes bones to life, even if it means she will return to dust and be no more.

“[Evokes] the dreamy tone and themes of Neil Gaiman’s Coraline and The Graveyard Book . . . an impressive new fairy tale that will appeal to fans of Lisa Graff’s subtly magical stories.” ―Booklist

“This magical story―and the brave girl in its pages―will haunt you in the best way.” ―Natalie Lloyd, New York Times bestselling author of Over the Moon

Version 6I love a spooky middle grade novel as much as the next gal, that’s why I am so excited about this interview with debut author, Heather Kassner. Close the curtains, pull up the covers, and let’s get spooky! 

1. Tell us about The Bone Garden.

The Bone Garden tells the story of a strange dust-and-bone girl named Irréelle whose greatest fear is that she isn’t real. A girl who has to be brave and ever hopeful as she navigates the graveyard (and the passageways beneath the graveyard) and seeks the magic that brought her to life—and could return her to dust.

  1.  How did you come up with the idea?

The idea for The Bone Garden started with the very first line, which came to me before anything else. “She descended into the basement, tasked with collecting the bones.” I caught a glimpse of a girl holding a candle in the dark, and from there, I followed her down a twisty staircase to see those bones for myself—and to learn who she was, who tasked her with this strange chore, and, of course, what the bones were used for.

  1. In what ways do you identify with Irréelle?

Irréelle is both vulnerable and hopeful, and having just been laid off from work when I wrote this story, I was feeling much the same. But it went deeper than that too. She also took on many of the feelings I had when I was younger, and which many kids can likely relate to—of being awkward or different or strange, of believing what others say about you, of thinking that you don’t always belong. What I wanted for Irréelle most of all was to be brave and hopeful enough to face the darkness in her life, just as I was trying to do for myself.

  1. The setting for your story is so unique. What is your process for world-building?

Imagining the world of a story, creating its very atmosphere, is one my favorite parts of writing. What helps me develop the world is visualization, specifically, picturing everything in my head as if it were a movie. With my eyes closed (and most often lying in bed), I bring a scene to mind and walk through it, exploring every shadowed corner.

  1. What are you working on now?

I recently submitted copyedits for my second book, a middle grade fantasy that comes out on August 4, 2020, called The Forest of Stars. It’s about a magical, windswept girl whose feet never touch the ground and the search for her father at a magnificent—yet shadow-filled—carnival beneath the stars.

  1. What message do you hope young readers will gain from reading your story?

My hope for younger readers reading The Bone Garden is the same hope I have for Irréelle—to be able to see their own worth unclouded by the perception of others. To trust in their true hearts and to know there is always a place they belong.

  1. What has been the most surprising thing about being a debut author?

When I drafted The Bone Garden, I didn’t know anyone else in the writing community. So being a debut author, the biggest surprise (and what I’m most thankful for) has been getting to know other writers. Making writing friends—and reading one another’s amazing stories—has made this entire experience all the more fun.

  1. If you have one piece of advice for our readers who are aspiring authors, what would it be?

A story I’m working on now came from a dream, and if I hadn’t forced myself to grab paper and pen (when all I wanted was to roll back over and sleep) the idea probably would have slipped away. So, if an idea pops into your head, write it down right away, as many details as you can. Don’t trust that you’ll remember it later.

Bio

Heather Kassner loves thunderstorms, hummingbirds, and books. She lives with her husband in Arizona, waiting (and waiting and waiting) for the rain, photographing hummingbirds, and reading and writing strange little stories. The Bone Garden is her debut novel.

Social Media

Website: http://www.heatherkassner.com/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/HeatherKassner

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/heather1ee/

Goodreads:https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/17523236.Heather_Kassner

Facebook:https://www.facebook.com/HeatherKassnerAuthor/